George H.W. Bush mourners pay tribute to the late president with colorful socks

George H.W. Bush, America’s 41st president, was known for a lot of things: his penchant for skydiving, commitment to writing notes and decorated military career. But one of the more colorful aspects of Bush’s life was his socks.

Bush, who died last week at the age of 94, was celebrated with praise and humorous memories at a funeral service at the Washington National Cathedral Wednesday.

Aside from attending or watching the moving service, many mourners chose to pay tribute to Bush another way – through their socks.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH’S LOVE OF QUIRKY SOCKS: AN UNLIKELY FASHION ICON

Many people shared photos of their eclectic socks on Twitter Wednesday, which President Trump previously declared a national day of mourning.

Jillian Travis, a first-grade teacher at Barbara Bush Elementary in Houston, Texas, shared a photo of many flashy feet.

“Here at Bush Elementary, President Bush’s death was especially close to our hearts. We paid our respects today by wearing crazy socks to honor his love for wearing colorful socks,” she said in a tweet.

Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman also shared a photo of her brightly-colored socked feet while thanking Bush “for being a shining example of a servant leader.”

The John Carroll School in Bel Air, Maryland, said its “community is also commemorating” Bush’s legacy with their footwear.

Melissa Marek, a health science teacher in Texas, donned some “crazy medical socks” in honor of the late president.

Cory Wilson, of Mississippi, said his colorful socks are a “tiny tribute” but “fitting” to honor Bush.

Bush will be buried Thursday at the George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University. His final resting place will be alongside Barbara Bush, his wife of 73 years who died in April, and Robin Bush, the daughter they lost to leukemia in 1953 at age 3.

He “will be carried to his final rest wearing socks that pay tribute to his lifetime of service, starting as an 18-year-old naval aviator in war,” Bush spokesman Jim McGrath said, sharing a photo on social media.