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Donald Trump Says Ben Carson Started Feud, ‘I Like to Finish It’

September 10, 2015 KID News

Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Donald Trump called into ABC’s The View Thursday morning, discussing a wide range of topics with the co-hosts.

Asked about Ben Carson’s questioning of Trump’s faith and whether the exchanges are now a full-on fight, the GOP presidential front-runner said, “He started it, so remember I like to finish it.”

The New York real estate mogul also continued his push against the White House-backed Iran deal.

“Nuclear is nothing but trouble … it’s a great deal for Iran,” Trump said.

Asked about public money for Planned Parenthood, which he said he would defund because of the high rate of abortions he said they perform, co-host Joy Behar said Planned Parenthood does “abortions for 3 percent of the people who come to them. The rest is women’s health. And that 3 percent is not federally funded. So nobody’s tax money is used for abortions. If you defund Planned Parenthood, millions of women will not get health care. I think since you have shown to have a big heart for the Syrians, you might want to extend that to women in this country.”

Trump, however, said “the numbers are 55 percent and 60 percent and 65 percent of the money.”

Co-host Michelle Collins asked Trump about Kanye West’s saying during the MTV Video Music Award’s that he would run for president in 2020.

“The thing I like most about Kanye West, he always speaks nicely about me. So I never hit anybody that frankly speaks nicely about me. I can’t do that,” Trump said, to which Behar chimed in: “God help them if they do” attack him.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Scott Walker’s Plan to ‘Wreak Havoc’ in Washington

September 10, 2015 KID News

Darren Hauck/Getty Images(EUREKA, Ill.) — Scott Walker heads to President Ronald Reagan’s alma mater, Eureka College, Thursday to lay out his plan to “wreak havoc” on Washington and renew the late president’s call to “drain the swamp” in the nation’s capital.

“Since he left, the swamp has filled up again,” Walker will say, according to an advance except of his speech. “We cannot expect those from Washington to fix Washington. Some people think you can fix Washington by putting new so-called experts in the same old places.”

Walker is also rolling out a series of “Day One promises” that he will be accountable to if elected, including a pledge to repeal and replace Affordable Care Act, do away with so-called “sanctuary cities” that do not enforce some federal immigration laws, and terminate the Iran deal. Going forward, Walker’s campaign will be rolling out a new “Day One promise” every week.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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DNC Chair Shuts Door on More Democratic Debates

September 10, 2015 KID News

Johnny Louis/FilmMagic(WASHINGTON) — The chair of the Democratic National Committee Chairman on Thursday brushed aside growing criticism of the party’s plan to limit its presidential candidates to six debates, saying her decision to hold that number was final and promised to disinvite candidates who appear at non-sanctioned debates.

“We are going to have six debates. Period,” Debbie Wasserman Schultz told reporters at a breakfast in Washington sponsored by the Christian Science Monitor. “We are looking forward to our six debates that are sanctioned by the DNC.”

Wasserman Schultz said she’s standing by that debate schedule despite louder calls by one candidate in particular, Martin O’Malley, to expand a debate schedule he says was essentially designed to protect Hillary Clinton from more exposure to her rivals.

Wasserman Schultz denies that the schedule was created with any candidate in particular in mind, though two DNC vice chairs came out publicly on Wednesday echoing calls for more debates.

She said her decision to limit the number to six is in keeping with the number of debates sanctioned by the national party in recent elections. She said she encourages all candidates to participate in “forums” that are not debates, but said she has decided not to budget on the number of debates.

“We need to make sure we do not let the debate process get out of control,” she said.

She is also sticking by her so-called “exclusivity rule,” which she said would mean having candidates “uninvited” to sanctioned debates if they choose to participate in debates the DNC does not formally recognize. Such a rule has never been imposed in previous cycles, though the Republican Party has something similar in place this year.

Wasserman Schultz also said she does not except that Harvard professor Larry Lessig will qualify for the Democratic debates. The party is requiring that candidates demonstrate 1 percent support in three national polls before earning a podium, and Lessig — who is running on a campaign-finance-reform platform and just got in the race — hasn’t gotten that level of support yet.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Donald Trump Finds Praise on Capitol Hill, but No GOP Endorsements

September 10, 2015 KID News

Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Lawmakers welcomed Donald Trump to Washington Wednesday to rally against the Iran nuclear agreement, praising the success of his campaign but stopping short of offering any endorsements.

Taking the stage outside the Capitol to R.E.M.’s “The End of the World,” the Republican front-runner criticized the Obama administration’s negotiations on the Iran deal.

“Never, ever, ever in my life have I seen any transaction so incompetently negotiated as our deal with Iran,” Trump proclaimed, saying Americans “may get bored with winning” under his administration.

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, who supports Trump’s hard line on immigration, said the New York real estate mogul’s appeal comes from his confidence.

“We’ve had presidents that didn’t make us proud to be Americans,” he said. “Trump is still working on the art of humility, but he’s put the swagger back in Americans.”

King is undecided on whom he will back, but expects members to endorse Trump as the race continues.

“I can’t imagine that not happening when you’re running first in the polls,” he said.

Freshman Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., who has been a prominent opponent of the Iran deal as Congress’s only Jewish Republican, broadly praised Trump’s positioning on foreign policy.

“He understands that our enemies do not respect weakness,” Zeldin said.

While Zeldin also said he wasn’t prepared to endorse Trump or any other candidate, he also complemented Trump’s persona.

“Americans want candid, brutally honest, sometimes politically incorrect leadership,” he said.

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., suggested Trump’s past positions and history as a Democrat may prevent some Republican politicians from endorsing his campaign.

“Donald Trump has not always been pro-life, and I hope that his conversion is complete,” said Franks, who is supporting former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

Former Minnesota Gov. Jessie Ventura and former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin have both spoken favorably of Trump’s presidential campaign, and Palin has said she’d serve as Trump’s energy secretary.

While he didn’t leave Washington with any new backers, Trump did get a meeting with Alabama’s Sen. Jeff Sessions, a Republican who has advised his campaign on immigration policy.

“Mr. Trump has outlined trade and immigration policies that serve the national interest, not the special interests,” Sessions said in a statement. “Anyone who wants to sit in the Oval Office must promote trade and immigration plan that improve jobs and wages for Americans.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Ben Carson Attacks Donald Trump’s Faith, Trump Fires Back

September 10, 2015 KID News

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump says opponent Ben Carson “makes [Jeb] Bush look like the energizer bunny.”

The Trump attack comes after Carson took a swing at Trump on faith Wednesday night, saying, “I’ve realized where my success has come from and I don’t in any way deny my faith in God. And I think that is the big difference,” he told reporters in response to a question asking him to differentiate between the two of them.

Carson, 63, said he doesn’t get the impression that faith is a big part of Trump’s life.

“By humility and the fear of the Lord are riches and honor and life and that’s a very big part of who I am. I don’t get that impression, maybe I’m wrong but I don’t get that,” Carson said before his rally in Anaheim, California.

Trump, 69, who has mocked Bush as a cure for insomnia, fired back on Twitter Wednesday night: “Wow, I am ahead of the field with Evangelicals (am so proud of this) and virtually every other group, and Ben Carson just took a swipe at me.”

On CNN’s New Day, Trump ripped into Carson, calling the retired neurosurgeon, who is credited with performing the first successful separation of conjoined twins, an “OK doctor.”

“If you look at his past, which I’ve done, he was not a big man of faith,” Trump said. “All of a sudden he’s become this man of faith.”

Trump leads Carson in a new CNN-ORC Poll released Thursday morning with 32 percent, with Carson in second place with 19 percent.

“Ben Carson,” Trump said, “is not going to be your next president.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Donald Trump Hits Highest Support Yet in New National Poll

September 10, 2015 KID News

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Donald Trump is showing no signs of slowing down.

Donald Trump has won over the support of almost a third of Republican voters in the country, stretching to 32 percent support — his highest national number this election cycle — in a new CNN/ORC poll out Thursday morning.

So what’s behind the real estate mogul’s eight-point boost since August? Two groups: women and college grads. Trump is up 13 percentage points among Republican women in the last month, according to CNN/ORC polls. He’s also climbed 12 points among Republicans with college degrees.

And now, a bare majority of Republican voters — 51 percent — say they think that Donald Trump will win the Republican nomination.

Trump is trailed by neurosurgeon Ben Carson, up 10 points since August to 19 percent support, and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush with 9 percent. Carson and Trump — who both have never been elected to public office — combine to garner support from 51 percent of Republican voters.

But while the Republican frontrunner continues to tick upward in national polls, a new Iowa poll shows Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton’s lead completely gone for the first time.

A new Quinnipiac University poll out Thursday morning shows Bernie Sanders at 41 percent and Hillary Clinton at 40 percent in Iowa — a virtual tie. Clinton is down 12 points since early July, while Sanders is up 8 points in the same timespan.

The results highlight a stark gender gap among Democratic voters: 49 percent of men support Sanders, while 28 percent support Clinton. But 49 percent of women support Clinton, while 35 percent support Sanders.

Vice President Joe Biden, who is still weighing a White House bid, clocked in at 12 percent.

Clinton continues to struggle in her trustworthiness amid questions about her private email server. Thirty percent of Democrats say she is not honest and trustworthy, compared to only 5 percent for Biden and 4 percent for Sanders.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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What Congress Did on Their Summer Vacation

September 10, 2015 KID News

Architect of the Capitol(WASHINGTON) — It’s back to Washington D.C. for Congress. Fresh from their summer vacations, members of the House and Senate have a heavily packed agenda ahead of them.

For five weeks, Congress was out of session and free to return home, however their vacation was still a working vacation.

But here’s a snippet of what Congress was up to while they were away from the Capitol.

Braved a New Diet

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker challenged himself to go 10 days without added sugar, bread, pasta and other carb filled foods. Sen. Booker started Aug. 3 and blew well past the 10-day mark, nearly going all month.

“My sugar cravings have all but subsided and I’ve done away with my late night eating,” Sen. Booker wrote in a post on Instagram. “I so appreciate all the encouragement I’ve been receiving from folks on this platform and love reading about the experiences of others on the same journey.”

Got in Touch with Nature

Calling it a “hiking town hall,” Rep. Eric Swalwell of California and his constituents got some exercise while talking politics along the Sycamore Grove Park’s Regional Trail.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-New Hampshire, and her daughter sought out some adventures. The two zip-lined at Gunstock ski resort in New Hampshire.

Sen. Susan Collins took advantage of Maine’s peak blueberry picking season. Wild blueberries are Maine’s official state fruit.

Democratic Congressman Keith Ellison of Minnesota went double kayaking along the Lake of the Isles in Minneapolis.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz snapped this picture of a sunset over his home state of Utah.

It was a Portman family outing to the Edge of Appalachia. Republican Senator Rob Portman brought his family to hike on the edge of his homestate of Ohio.

It wasn’t all sunshine and beaches for everyone. Alaskan Senator Lisa Murkowski spent her Labor Day weekend with the U.S. Coast Guard aboard one of the National Security Cutters.

Traveled to Israel

To prepare themselves for key votes on the Iran nuclear deal this fall, nearly 100 representatives, Democratic and Republican took a trip to Israel.

Republican lawmakers Mimi Walters, Garret Graves and Patrick McHenry all went for a morning run in Jerusalem with the Dome of the Rock in the backdrop.

Prepped for Fall

It seems some want Fall to come quick. Rep. Paul Ryan, a huge Green Bay Packers fan, tweeted this picture.

Attended State Fairs

The Iowa State Fair was a big attraction this summer for politicians, and presidential hopefuls. The fair this year attracted 1 million people over 11 days.

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley posed for a picture in front of the butter cow.

And Iowan Rep. Steve King ate fried butter — just one of the many fried foods sold the fair.

Celebrity Run-In

Chuck Schumer ran into one of the lead singers of Blue Oyster Cult — the band known for the song “(Don’t …read more […]

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What Jeb Bush’s Tax Plan Might Mean for You

September 10, 2015 KID News

ABC News(GARNER, N.C.) — Of all the topics U.S. voters have to understand, none is more complicated than taxes. Think 80,000 pages of convoluted code, abstract loopholes and what seems like innumerable exemptions.

Confused yet?

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush said he wants to change all that.

“Of all the terrible things that can be said about our tax code – and I can think of a few – the worst is probably this: It punishes people for doing things we should encourage and rewards people for doing things that may not be so good. It taxes paychecks hard but gives companies a write-off for debt,” Bush said Wednesday in North Carolina. “I believe it’s time we build for the future, not borrow from it.”

In short, he plans to simplify the tax code, making it so that ordinary people can understand and file their own taxes. So what would this mean for you? We asked these two economists to help us figure it out:

Kevin Hassett: director of economic policy studies, the American Enterprise Institute, served as a policy consultant to the U.S. Treasury under Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Harry Stein: director, fiscal policy, the Center for American Progress

“It’s a really big proposal; kind of thing that a president pushes in the first State of the Union. It has a million bells and whistles,” Hassett said, adding, “It’s the kind of impressive tax plan that you usually don’t see.”

1. Reducing Tax Brackets:

Bush’s big goal is to do what President Reagan did: lower tax rates. In his policy plan, instead of seven brackets, there are now three: 28 percent, 25 percent and 10 percent. Bush noted in an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal that “at 28 percent, the highest tax bracket would return to where it was when President Ronald Reagan signed into law his monumental and successful 1986 tax reform.”

QUESTION: Aren’t these just more tax cuts for the wealthy?


Hassett:
That will undoubtedly benefit people in upper brackets more. One of the things we’ve seen is a collapse in the role of small business in the economy … this is the policy that has the potential to have the biggest positive effect.

Stein: Bush’s tax plan would give huge tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans. It cuts taxes on investment income, which overwhelmingly benefits the wealthy (since they are the ones with wealth to invest).

2. Eliminating Penalties and Other Taxes

Bush’s plan also eliminates certain taxes to double the standard deduction now taken by roughly two-thirds of all filers. He would cut the marriage penalty, which causes some married couples to pay higher taxes than they would if they were single.

It also expands the Earned Income Tax Credit, ends the death tax, which requires a person’s estate to be taxed, retires the Alternative Minimum Tax and ends the employee’s share of the Social Security tax on earnings for workers older than 67.

Bush says that, under his plan, 15 million Americans would no longer bear any income-tax liability. Families of four, with an income less …read more […]

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Donald Trump Flip-Flops on Canada-Born Ted Cruz’s Eligibility to Run

September 10, 2015 KID News

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has reversed his position on Ted Cruz’s eligibility to run for president, now saying his Canadian birthplace shouldn’t disqualify him.

“I hear it was checked out by every attorney and every which way and I understand Ted is in fine shape,” Trump told ABC News just before speaking at a Capitol Hill rally blasting the Iran nuclear deal.

That stands in stark contrast to what Trump said about Cruz in December, when he told ABC News that Cruz’s Canadian birth could prevent him from running.

“I think he’s a really nice guy, I’ve gotten to know him a little bit, but I think if he’s born in Canada it’s a problem no question about it,” he said during an interview at Washington’s iconic Old Post Office, which Trump recently acquired and is transforming into a luxury hotel.

But there seems to be no love lost between the two presidential contenders, with Trump also joking that there is a “little bit of a romance” between him and the junior Texas senator.

Cruz also embraced their partnership, telling ABC News he’s unabashed about the fact that Trump’s presence at any event benefits Cruz.

“Everywhere Donald goes, he brings a hundred television cameras with him,” Cruz said, blatantly acknowledging that he’s trying to win Trump’s supporters, as he is for every one of his GOP rivals.

“I don’t believe Donald is going to be the nominee. We are running to win this nomination,” he said. “And I am hoping to win every one of Donald Trump’s supporters.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Joe Biden’s No. 1 Advisor: Why Jill Biden May Be Key to His 2016 Decision

September 10, 2015 KID News

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — In 1975, Frank Biden encouraged his brother Joe, a first-term Delaware senator, to call an aspiring teacher and part-time local model named Jill Jacobs to ask her out on a date.

“You’ll like her Joe. … She doesn’t like politics,” Frank told Biden, according to the vice president’s 2007 memoir, “Promises to Keep.”

Forty years and two unsuccessful presidential campaigns later, Jill Jacobs is now Dr. Jill Biden, the Second Lady of the United States, a full-time community college professor and on the cusp of her husband potentially launching a third run for the White House. Vice President Joe Biden’s 2016 decision could ultimately hinge on how his wife feels about another campaign, especially as the family grapples with the death of their son Beau.

“If Jill were not happy — it sounds like a stupid thing — but I’m not happy,” the vice president said about his upcoming decision in a 2014 New Yorker interview.

“In the end it will be Joe and Jill deciding of course what they want,” Valerie Biden Owens, the vice president’s sister, said in the same article.

At an Atlanta synagogue last week, the vice president said, “I just don’t know” whether he and his family are ready for a presidential campaign, and Dr. Biden reportedly shares that hesitancy and concern for their family as they grieve Beau.

But Biden’s wife has also been his strongest supporter and confidant since the early days of their marriage, despite her initial aversion to politics. The vice president credits his wife for reviving his life and political career following the death of his first wife Neilia and daughter Naomi in a car accident.

“She gave me back my life; she made me start to think my family might be whole again,” Biden wrote in his 2007 memoir.

Dr. Biden has been alongside the vice president as he weighed his previous presidential runs. She was skeptical of his 1988 campaign and the “personal price” it would have on their family, the vice president wrote. But ahead of the 2008 race, she pushed him to launch a campaign.

“I want you to run this time,” she told her husband, according to Biden’s memoir. “It’s up to you, but we’ll support it.” When he asked her why he should run, she said, “We think you can unite the country.”

She was also the one who urged him to reconsider Barack Obama’s request to vet him as a vice presidential candidate after he initially declined the offer — which ultimately landed Biden on the 2008 Democratic ticket.

Dr. Biden, who holds two masters degrees and a Ph.D., is the only known second lady to maintain a full-time job while also performing official duties as the wife of the vice president.

An English professor at Northern Virginia Community College, Dr. Biden has elevated issues close to her personally at the White House, including expanding access to community colleges and advocating for military families, a topic of significant importance to her given Beau’s service in the Delaware Army National Guard.

On Wednesday, …read more […]